Oh The Places You’ll Go

What should I do with my life? What am I passionate about? What job should I take? What if I don’t like my profession? Which direction should I go?

These are all questions that have gone through my mind at some point, and I’m sure I’m not the only one. They are questions that people grapple with, and they are important to think through and seek discernment in. Although these questions are valid, I believe there is an unnecessary pressure in society for people to pick a career and figure out what they want to do with their lives before they have even experienced life. Discovering your passion and pursuing a career is a good goal to have because I know God has placed passions, dreams, and desires in our lives for us to pursue with Him. But sometimes I feel like I need to tell people a 10 year plan for my life in order to validate the intrinsic value of what I am doing in the present, when in reality I have no idea what is ahead, and I am not always sure about what I want to specifically do within the sphere of ministry.

I used to struggle with feeling like I didn’t have a practical passion. I was passionate about things, but not defined occupational things. I would get worried that I wouldn’t find that one thing that I was made to do. A lot of time has passed since then, so I have learned more about life, myself, and what I enjoy doing. Yet sometimes I still struggle with wondering if I’m doing the right thing, or worry that I am not passionate enough about certain things. I could discuss all of my self-reflection and discoveries and blah blah blah…but that’s not what I want to focus on.

When I talk about the journey of life and what I think I want to do, I often tell people that it is not as much about what I do as it is how I live. I don’t always know what I want to do, but I know how I want to live. Let me explain, what I do is valuable, but how I carry out what I do is what matters.

Since I am a follower of Christ, I already know how I am supposed to live. He lays out in His Word how I should conduct myself. I am to carry out whatever I do with faithfulness and integrity. I am to rejoice in the Lord in all things. I am to serve humbly; and the list goes on. Even if I were to do something I had little interest in, I am called to do it well and live in such a way that points others to the Lord. Of course, those are not traits I naturally incapsulate. I’m prideful, I get discouraged, I don’t always have a God-honoring attitude. That is when God’s grace comes in. He is willing and able to produce His character in me. He calls me to reflect His character every day as a witness to others. It is His desire for all of us. He will equip us.

The way I love the Lord and love people within the everyday actions of what I am doing is what is eternally valuable. It is my joy to serve in whatever capacity He wants me to. I am beyond thankful to be serving the Lord here in South Africa. I know it is where God wants me to be at this moment and I am determined to make the most of it; but I can serve here in South Africa doing everything I should be doing, all without submitting to the Lord’s purpose in my conduct and interactions with others. If that were the case, I would be completely missing the point.

I believe we focus too much on what we do with our lives rather than how we live them. Our lives are more than the career we pursue. It is about how we live and ultimately, whom we are living for. Our lives are always drawing people’s attention to something. I don’t want my life to be about myself, and yet so many times that is the message I am sending to others. I desire that everything I say and do come out of a heart that is fully in sync with the heart of God. A heart that longs for people to be in close relationship with Him. I want to love fiercely, be present, and be intentional with my relationship with God and others. If I were a waiter at a restaurant, a lawyer, a housekeeper, a soccer coach, a nurse, an accountant, or any other vocation; my purpose would still be the same. To love God, love people, and make Him known. To quote C.T Studd “Only one life, ‘twill soon be past, Only what’s done for Christ will last.”

Here’s the truth, wherever God has you at the moment is where you are meant to be. That doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t seek growth or pursue being in a different place in life. It means you are responsible to live each moment well, no matter where you are or what you’re doing. In reality, there are people in their 30s, 40s, and 50s who are still figuring out what they want to do with their lives, and that’s ok! No matter what age you are, just breathe. Don’t get so caught up in finding what you want to do for the rest of your life that you actually miss your life. Instead, seek to serve the Lord in every aspect of your life. He knows everything about you, what you are good at, what you desire. Let Him show you how you should live and He will guide you in what you should do. Life is short. Love well, explore, have fun, forgive, chase dreams, grow in experience, change careers, or be content doing what you have been doing!

Now I don’t worry as much about whether I am doing the job I was made for. I was made to glorify God in anything and everything I do. That is what matters. That is what fulfills. “And whatever you do, whether in word or deed, do it all in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God the Father through him.” Colossians 3:17. He made all of us and infused us with certain abilities and passions ultimately meant for serving Him. He knows the complexities of our hearts. I trust that He will continue to guide me and put me in whatever context I need to be in as I pursue Him, my one true passion.

Blessings,

Shannon Roach 

“Whatever you do, work heartily, as for the Lord and not for men.” Colossians 3:23

 

Ticked Off Jonah

I enjoy studying the Bible. If you know me, you know that. Let me clarify however. I enjoy observing and interpreting the Bible, I do not enjoy the application part of the Bible. It is much more fun to see what the Bible meant back then than it is to see what the Bible is confronting in me and is calling me to do.

The book of Jonah confronted the mess out of me. As horrible of a man as Jonah was prone to be, I see myself in him. Unfortunately it is unavoidable, there is no way of getting around it.

Many know the story of Jonah. He runs from God’s call and finds himself in the belly of a big ol’ fish. After prayerfully turning from his rebellion, the Lord has the fish spit him up on dry land and then recommissions Jonah to Nineveh.

However, most of us, including myself, have never really dug into the second half of the story after the fish blew chunks.

Jonah chapter 3 recounts what happens in Nineveh. Jonah walks in and proclaims that destruction is coming. The people of Nineveh believe in God, repent in sackcloth and ashes, and the king of Nineveh decrees a city-wide fast in hopes of God relenting from the impending doom that Jonah said was coming. The final verse of chapter three tells of how God saw them turn from their wicked ways and how He chose thus to save the city at that time. Wow. Miraculous repentance. City-wide repentance. City-saving repentance. Brought about by God’s mercy and grace through the proclamation of His servant Jonah.

You would think such an awe-inspiring act of repentance and subsequent mercy would lead Jonah into a grateful and thankful proclamation of praise.

Nope.

Instead, we read:

But it greatly displeased Jonah and he became angry. He prayed to the Lord and said, “Please Lord, was not this what I said while I was in still in my own country? Therefore in order to forestall this I fled to Tarshish, for I knew that You are a gracious and compassionate God, slow to anger and abundant in lovingkindness, and one who relents concerning calamity. – Jonah 4:1-2

Wait, what?

Jonah witnesses the salvation of a city and gets ticked off. He cries out to the Lord and says that God’s kindness and mercy and compassion is the very reason he didn’t want to come to Nineveh in the first place. He’s so angry that he tells God to just kill him already (verse 3).

Later on in the chapter, Jonah will leave the city and wait to see what would end up happening. God brings a plant to give him shade and comfort, but the following day God removes the plant via a small worm and Jonah is wrecked by a scorching eastern wind. In verse eight he hilariously (or sadly) gets so mad that he tells God to just kill him yet again.

The book of Jonah concludes with the following:

Then God said to Jonah, “Do you have good reason to be angry about the plant?” And he said, “I have good reason to be angry, even to death.” Then the Lord said, “You had compassion on the plant for which you did not work and which you did not cause to grow, which came up overnight and perished overnight. Should I not have compassion on Nineveh, the great city in which there are more than 120,000 persons who do not know the difference between their right and left hand, as well as many animals?” – Jonah 4:9-11

The book of Jonah runs all up on me and doesn’t take it easy.

At first, it didn’t. At first, I was ready to put the Bible study I had finished on Jonah back on my shelf and move on to whatever was next. But I lingered. I read the narrative again and got a face full of conviction.

I am like Jonah.

At first, I didn’t think so. I would never, I mean surely would never, be unwilling to share the goodness of Jesus and be angry at God when He saved.

My mind however goes back to Phoenix, AZ (I know that I write a lot about this chapter of my life, so forgive me for going back there again. I will say however that it’s simply a fact that it is in the deserts of life [this time a literal desert] that God teaches us the most).

Leading up to my departure, I regularly listened to and belted out “Thy Will Be Done” by Hillary Scott. It was my anthem. I shouted it out and I meant it. Thy will be done Lord. No matter what. Thy will be done, no matter the cost.

Yet then I caved into fear and let the trials of my life break down my faith. I was in a place that was foreign to me, loud, busy, full of people and most of them were not like me.

A couple weeks into my Phoenix season that song came on the radio. I distinctly remember turning it off. I did this each time it played the whole time I was there. I didn’t want God’s will to be done. Because I knew it would cost me. I knew it would cost me my comfort, my security, my ideal life. I wanted my will to be done instead.

It really is no wonder that that was the worst year of my life because of that fact.

God had commissioned me to a people that needed to hear about His Son, and although I did share and serve, my life was never wholly surrendered to God.

I really am like Jonah.

Maybe you’re like Jonah too. Maybe you are more concerned with your comfort than the salvation of those around you.

Don’t wallow in this. Pray for the ability and strength to change.

Cry out to God.

And remember,

. . . Salvation is from the Lord. – Jonah 2:9b

In His Name,

Nate Roach

 

Love, Vocation, Geography

We tend to put the Spirit in a box where its primary purpose is to help us in love, vocation, and geography. What I mean by this is that the majority of my conversations in which the Holy Spirit comes up revolve around who someone is going to marry, what job they will have, and where they will live. These are all things that growing up I felt a lot of pressure to make a “Spirit-led” decision in. This led me also to relegate the Holy Spirit to a position in my life where his primary purpose was to speak to me in those areas alone.

God the Holy Spirit does lead us, but the primary meaning of the leading of the Holy Spirit is not to lead us to marry this person or that person or to lead us to Cincinnati or Chicago. The primary place to which the Spirit leads us is to holiness and obedience. – R.C. Sproul 

I’ve enjoyed everything I’ve read from Sproul, and this quote is no exception. Nestled in a booklet about Christian conscience is this quote that speaks volumes.

The Holy Spirit’s primary leading in our life should be towards holiness and obedience. Take for instance the classic Fruit of the Spirit passage in Galatians 5. This chapter pits two lists of characteristics against each other, the fruit of the flesh and the fruit of the Spirit. We are all likely familiar with the so-named ‘fruit of the Spirit’, the characteristics that we as believers should have and exemplify (we all fall short, but it’s what we should be striving towards). In this chapter we come to Galatians 5:25, one of my favorite verses for its encouragement and conviction. This coupled with Galatians 5:16 gives us the primary purpose of the Holy Spirit’s leading.

If we live by the Spirit, let us also keep in step with the Spirit. – Galatians 5:25

I say then, walk by the Spirit and you will certainly not carry out the desire of the flesh. – Galatians 5:16

These verses do not say ‘walk by the Spirit and you will know explicitly who you are to marry, where you are to live, and what you should do with your life”. These are aspects of our lives that God does speak into no doubt, but let us not relegate the Spirit of God to just these areas.

In efforts to potentially take some weight off younger and older believers alike, let’s take a quick look at what I personally believe (and I may be wrong, and you may not agree with me) regarding love, vocation, and geography.

LOVE 

I personally do not believe that the idea of ‘the one’ is accurate. We romanticize this ideology and that’s not necessarily good. I believe that we are called by Scripture to marry someone who is of the opposite gender and who has saving faith in the Lord Jesus Christ. Outside of those two parameters, I believe that God is more concerned with us showing Christlike love to our spouse than he is us finding the perfect man or woman for us (newsflash, no perfect men or women exist). In my relationship with Jamie, I never got a lightning flash dreamlike moment where God audibly spoke to me and said she’s the one. Instead I found myself incredibly attracted to her outward appearance, her character, and her love for the Lord. Our goals and aspirations lined up, we enjoy being around each other, and so we have committed to loving each other for life. Seeking godly counsel and prayer do go a long way, but I don’t necessarily believe that there’s a rule of thumb where you get an audible confirmation from God about the person you want to marry.

VOCATION 

As previously stated, there are times where God explicitly calls people to do specific things with their lives (I have had God’s call on my life to be in vocational ministry. This was not an audible speech moment, rather a feeling in my gut that was affirmed and confirmed through prayer and godly counsel). More often than not though, I believe that we are to use the natural gifts we’ve been given by God in a way that brings honor and glory to His name. So if you’re a gifted scientist, do that for Christ. If you’re a gifted orator, do that for Christ. If you’re a gifted teacher, do that for Christ. In the midst of my sister having a specific calling from God on her life to one day do overseas missions, I remember playing XBOX as a teenager racking my brain and trying to discern God’s will so as not to garner his anger by stepping outside it. When boiled down, I believe that God’s will for us vocationally is to love God and love neighbor through something that we are gifted at, and the rest is just geography.

GEOGRAPHY

This sounds repetitive, but it’s true. There are times where God calls men and women to specific locations. Most of the time however I believe that God is more concerned with how we live than where we live. When making decisions regarding where you live, you should again pray and seek counsel. But don’t sit around waiting for an audible voice. The question should remain the same regardless of whether you’re talking about love, vocation, or geography: “will this bring glory to Christ?”

My decision to leave Phoenix and move to Vernon was never confirmed by signs and wonders. It was a decision made between me and Jamie, with the counsel of friends and families, in that we felt like we could serve the Lord faithfully here and bring glory to His name. Today marks six months and it stands as one of the better decisions I’ve ever made.

I hope that this brings a breath of fresh air to many of us who become anal about the will of God. I welcome discussion and disagreement, just be cordial please.

The main thing (although I’ve devoted little words to it really) I want to share is that you shouldn’t limit the Spirit to these decisions. The Spirit of God is in your life to lead you in obedience and holiness.

In His Name,

Nathan Roach

 

100% Him, 0% Me

The beauty of the gospel message is that I’ve been accepted by God because of Christ. It is not contingent upon anything that I can do. This may seem like such a basic truth but let it sink in. God accepted me because of the life and death of His Son. I didn’t do anything and will never do anything that makes me worthy of saving. Ever. All I do is have faith that Christ has already done all the work for my salvation.

Here at Wellspring Church, I’ve been leading the Young Adult group through the book of Galatians, and this has been immensely impactful in my own heart and walk with the Lord. Last week we looked at just the first passage in Galatians and how the gospel is vibrantly on display in what is a simple greeting portion of Paul’s letter.

Paul, an apostle – sent not from men nor by a man, but by Jesus Christ and God the Father, who raised him from the dead – and all the brothers and sisters with me, To the churches of Galatia: Grace and peace to you from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ, who gave himself for our sins to rescue us from the present evil age, according to the will of our God and Father, to whom be glory for ever and ever. Amen. – Galatians 1:1-5

The gospel is infused into this greeting and it’s worthy of our attention. In just a short side-note before we look at it, I find it incredibly encouraging that the gospel is not just for those who are beginning in faith or have just recently come to know the Lord. The gospel is for every day of our lives as followers of Christ. All of the New Testament letters have the message of the gospel explicitly on display, and that should remind us that we should be preaching the gospel to ourselves every single day because these letters were written to churches, written to followers of Christ.

The gospel is at work in what Tim Keller describes as kind of a four point outline here in this passage.

Who We Are. While there is nothing explicitly said about mankind here in regards to the gospel, the word ‘rescue’ in verse four tells us all that we need to know. As sinful man, we were in need of a great rescue. We were in need of the Lord to come and rescue us from sin and the consequences of that sin which is death. We were helpless and lost. We didn’t need a moral teacher or a powerful leader, we needed God incarnate. We need rescuing.

What Jesus Did. Jesus gave Himself for our sins (v. 4). Jesus didn’t purchase with his death a second chance for us or a fresh start or a clean slate. No, what He did was far more than that. Jesus purchased us our freedom. He did ALL we cannot do but needed to do. We thus cannot fall back into condemnation. We are completely free.

What The Father Did. God the Father accepted the work of Christ by raising Christ from the dead (v. 1). God the Father also via the work of the gospel grants us grace and peace (v. 3). Even as a follower of Christ my two biggest struggles are wrapped up in guilt and shame. Yet the very nature of the gospel destroys those two realities. Grace covers over all of our guilt and in place of shame comes the peace of God that surpasses all understanding.

Why He Did It. Here’s the big part. God did all of this simply because it was His will to do so. It has nothing at all to do with me. This passage says nothing about mankind being deserving in even the slightest bit. No, this passage makes clear that the gospel was simply God’s plan. It’s all because of grace. That’s the motivation behind what God did. It was all about His grace. glory

That is why verse five is so powerful. The gospel is 100% about what God did and 0% about anything I have or ever will do. It is because of this that God gets all the glory forever and ever amen.

This is the message of the gospel. Walk every day in the grace of Christ and preach yourself this truth each morning.

In His Name,

Nate Roach

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