The New Creation Has Begun

All of mankind destroyed in a moment.

All save one family sheltered from the raging flood of God’s wrath.

One family deemed righteous in the sight of God.

One family saved.

The story of Noah’s Ark is one that we’ve missed the focus of for quite some time. At least in my opinion. The story of Noah’s Ark is normally taught to little kids. And I’m not so sure it should be. Yes, it’s cute to imagine the scene of the animals coming to Noah on the ark.

But the whole story of Noah’s Ark is about the wrath of God. His righteous, just, fair anger towards the wickedness of man (Genesis 6:5). After a century of grace, of time for man to repent (Genesis 6:3), God brought His wrath to bear on the world. Massive destruction. Whether or not you believe in a global flood is not the primary point of application. This story should cause us to reflect on the righteous wrath of our God. It’s easy for our modern sensibilities to cause us to ignore the wrath of God. Yet it is an undeniable theme of Scripture. Even the other day I noticed in Ezra 5:12 that we are given a reminder that God’s anger led to their enslavement (which was ultimately for their good and His glory, mind you. Read the whole story, not just the one verse).

God’s anger poured out upon the earth.

Death came.

Have you ever stopped and let your mind linger on this story? The waiting and watching as the oceans flooded the earth, as all of life was destroyed.

Then, slowly but surely, the waters began to recede, to dissipate.

And in its place, life.

New life.

Noah and family start to think that maybe they’ll soon be getting off the ark. Noah opens up a window and lets a dove out. The dove comes back after circling the earth and finding nowhere to land.

Then, well, then the beautiful happens.

He waited seven more days and again sent out the dove from the ark. When the dove returned to him in the evening, there in its beak was a freshly plucked olive leaf! Then Noah knew that the water had receded from the earth. – Genesis 8:10-11

Again. Have you lingered on this? It’s easy for us to read these stories and assume all these Biblical ‘heroes’ had insane faith in the midst of what they were experiencing. I don’t think that’s the case. Noah was not a perfect man. He was a drunk who passed out nude in front of his family. Isn’t it possible that after over FIVE MONTHS on an ark he started to doubt if God was going to come through?

I think so.

I think he likely started to wonder if new life would come. He sends out the dove, and the dove comes back with an olive leaf (fascinatingly enough, that became a historical signal for peace. God hangs his ‘bow’ back in the sky. We miss the significance of that when we only think about that as colorful, and not a symbol of war).

The dove comes back, communicating that new life has come. What a beautiful scene. But it points forward to a scene that brings tears to my eyes. It points forward to the Lamb who takes away the sins of the world.

Cause you see, despite God’s grace, the people screw things up again.

For centuries, the people of God fail to live holy lives, fail to be distinct from the culture around them. The human heart remains wicked, broken, evil, full of sin. Injustice and pain is brought about by the people of God. The prophets rise again and again to try and correct the sins of the people of God, and yet their messages are not heeded.

Then, silence.

Centuries of silence.

The promise of a Messiah faded into legend.

Again, it is extremely likely that doubt began to rise in the hearts of man.

Then, one day, a prophet arises from the wilderness. He is wearing camel’s hair and eating locusts. He begins to proclaim that the Kingdom of God has come, that the Messiah is here.

Honestly just typing this is giving me goosebumps.

Imagine.

Imagine the scene. People begin to flock to Him.

Then a man comes to Him.

And this is what happens next.

The next day John saw Jesus coming toward him and said, “Look, the Lamb of God, who takes away the sin of the world! . . . Then John gave this testimony: “I saw the Spirit come down from heaven as a dove and remain on him. – John 1:29, 32

BEHOLD THE LAMB OF GOD, WHO TAKES AWAY THE SINS OF THE WORLD. Those words had to of hit the people listening hard. They knew all about sacrificial lambs. They knew about lambs used to atone for personal sin, familial sin, nationwide sin. But now a man steps into the Jordan while a prophet claims that He is going to absolve the entire world (all who choose to believe and submit) of their sin.

Then (with tears in my eyes again) the Spirit is shown to descend on the Son.

In the form of. . .

A dove.

New life had come.

And this time, it would last.

The Messiah had arrived. To bring life out of death. To bring new life that lasts. To inaugurate the Kingdom of God on earth. To set us free from all of our sin. Through His death.

He lived a perfect life. He ministered for three years, showing His power over nature and the spiritual realm. He taught a way of life that would begin to turn the world upside down.

Then, one night, he found Himself in a garden, an olive grove to be exact (THE BIBLE IS ONE STORY!!!!!!). After toil and tears, He obeyed His Father to the point of death.

And through His death, we have life.

Life to the fullest.

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In His Name,

Nathan Roach

 

 

Christian, Be Quiet

It was late in the Summer of 2017.

It was a Saturday afternoon, and I was hanging out at my apartment in Phoenix, AZ with my friend Matt and my then girlfriend, now wife, Jamie. I got a text that my dad needed to talk to me, so I stepped outside into the 112 degree heat and gave him a ring.

My dad informed me that my eighteen year old brother who had run away about a year prior had chosen to legally remove himself from our family. This was something he could do without consulting us given the laws in Texas.

Before I even got off the phone, I was already in tears. Questions were racing through my mind.

Why would God allow this?

My parents followed God’s call to open up our home to this young man, to adopt him, to make him part of our family and bestow upon him all the blessings of parents that love him dearly.

Then he practically spat in their faces and took off.

For a year I prayed and prayed and prayed and now God allowed him to leave our family. No hope of reconciliation and restoration. No hope of a family reunion down the line where broken things are restored.

Instead, my parents lost a son and I lost a brother.

I made my way back to my door, got through it, and then collapsed to the ground. I sat there crying right in my doorway. Jamie and Matt came running and I barely eked out the words “Trevor left our family”.

For what felt like an eternity, I sobbed as Matt and Jamie sat on the floor next to me, consoling me. They didn’t speak. All you could hear were my cries.

In the book of Job, we see Job get blasted with suffering in the first two chapters. By the latter half of chapter two, Job is alone in his suffering, his own wife leaving him to suffer in silence.

When Job’s three friends, Eliphaz the Temanite, Bildad the Shuhite and Zophar the Naamathite, heard about all the troubles that had come upon him, they set out from their homes and met together by agreement to go and sympathize with him and comfort him. When they saw him from a distance, they could hardly recognize him; they began to weep aloud, and they tore their robes and sprinkled dust on their heads. Then they sat on the ground with him for seven days and seven nights. No one said a word to him, because they saw how great his suffering was. – Job 2:11-13 

We learned from the first chapter of Job that Job was a man of renown in the region where he lived (1:3). Word of his suffering spread, and three of his friends from the surrounding area came and sought to encourage him.

They noticed how much pain he was in, joined in his pain, mourned with him, and said nothing to him for a week.

These three will later show their foolishness to us, but here at the onset they teach us a considerable amount about how to respond to the suffering of a friend.

The main truth is this.

Keep your mouth shut.

Suffering as a Christian is a reality. It is a promise straight from the lips of our Savior. It is to be expected. That being said, what a Christian or non-Christian for that matter needs to know in the midst of their suffering is that you are for them and that you are with them.

I’m sure many of us have stories where we sought to open up about a difficulty, a tragedy in our lives, only to be told right off the bat by good-hearted, well-meaning Christians that God has a purpose for our pain.

There are a plethora of Scriptures that teach that. We saw just in our last blog that God uses good and bad for our benefit, and that we should be willing to accept both from Him (Receiving Bad From God). But, in the throes of intense suffering, the best thing that you can do is keep your mouth shut. Cry with them. Mourn with them. Sit with them. Listen to them rant, listen to them cry out about God and against him. As time progresses, then you can share the beautiful truths of Scripture. But you do the faith a disservice when you come in with cookie-cutter statements.

Matt and Jamie sat and mourned with me.

They let me get angry, get sad, wrestle with God.

They never brought up anything. They simply listened.

Imagine if I had come through the door of my apartment, collapsed on the ground, only for Matt and Jamie to say “Don’t cry, God’s got a plan”. That would have been the most detrimental thing they could have done in that moment.

Look at this verse.

Like one who takes away a garment on a cold day, or like vinegar poured on a wound, is one who sings songs to a heavy heart. – Proverbs 25:20 

I’m sure we all have stories of when someone spoke too soon instead of listening to us in our pain. I have been on both sides. I have been spoken to instead of listened to, but I’ve also opened my stupid mouth in the midst of the suffering of others. Brothers and sisters in Christ, let’s not be the type of people who take away coats on cold days. Let’s not be people who, even in a church setting like Sunday School, offer up trite and flippant sayings from Scripture instead of letting people have a place to suffer and yet feel loved.

It breaks my heart to acknowledge that many have left church, or even given up on following Jesus, because you and I open our mouths instead of keeping them shut.

Christian, be quiet.

Let us show our communities that our churches are places where they can suffer, where they can be raw about their doubts and angers, their fears and anxieties, their wrestling with God. If our churches aren’t a safe place for people to wrestle with God in suffering, we will continue to see our churches die out as the next generation finds more loving people outside the church than inside it.

Again, I’m not accusing anyone of malicious ill will.

I’m rather reminding us that we all struggle, we all wrestle, we all fight, we all doubt, we all lose hope in the midst of suffering. If you have had a suffering-free life, you’re likely a kid or the luckiest person alive. So why do we not allow people to suffer? Why don’t we allow them the place and space to get to the point where they, like Job, can say “My Redeemer lives”.

Sometimes that is hard to say right off the bat.

For me, it has taken years to get to the point where I can reflect on Trevor’s story and have hope. Some days it still wanes.

Let’s suffer together.

Christian, be quiet.

In His Name,

Nathan Roach

Afraid Of Giants

Do you ever wish God would audibly speak to you? That He would tell you what to do, where to go, and that He would be with you? Or if not you, wouldn’t it be nice to have someone so in tune with God that they could communicate His promises to you? Honestly, I wish I had that setup sometimes. In my naïve and innocent mind, I convince myself I would never doubt God’s promises or commands if I could just hear them out loud from a person of God.

At one point in time, the people of God had that luxury. They had men and women who heard from God and relayed God’s message to the people. The intro to the book of Deuteronomy teaches us, however, that despite these clear verbal messages, the people still rebelled. They rebelled big time. They quivered in fear, doubted God, whined and complained, and even begged to be thrown back in slavery. True story.

The book of Deuteronomy is more or less Moses’ last will and testament. He is standing between his people and the promised land. This is his final sermon. He begins (what is the first three chapters of Deuteronomy) by reminding the people of God all of what had occurred so far between God and this present generation’s ancestors. So, be aware, what is being described in these chapters has already happened; the books of Exodus, Leviticus, and Numbers tell these stories. Moses is merely reminding them of what has gone on before.

Moses reminds them first of God’s promise to their parents to give them victory over their enemies. Look at the passage with me.

See, I have set the land before you; go in and take possession of the land that I swore to your ancestors, to Abraham, to Isaac, and to Jacob, to give to them and their descendants after them. – Deuteronomy 1:6

Moses then recounts what he told their parents:

I said to you. . . See, the Lord your God has given the land to you; go up, take possession, as the Lord, the God of your ancestors, has promised you; do not fear or be dismayed.” – Deuteronomy 1:20, 21

Let’s zero in on this past event. The stage is set. The people of God know without a doubt what God had promised them: a land for their possession, a God who would never leave them, and a Lord who would fight for them. You would think they’d jump right up and run right in to battle.

Sadly, that’s not what happened.

Instead we see that the people of God disobeyed the commands of God. As Deuteronomy 1 continues, we hear Moses speaking, reminding the people of how things went south. Moses reminds them it was their idea to send spies into the land (vv. 22-25). At first glance you might see things look hopeful. At first glance it looks like they’re preparing for war. But then you read verse 26.

But you were unwilling to go up. You rebelled against the command of the Lord your God; you grumbled in your tents and said, “It is because the Lord hates us that he has brought us out of the land of Egypt, to hand us over to the Amorites to destroy us. – Deuteronomy 1:26-27

Wow.

We know from the book of Numbers it was the presence of thirteen-foot giants in the land that prevented the people of God from having the courage to fight for what was theirs.

Fear of giants kept the people of God out of the land of promise.

This might be where some would stop and bring up the cliché ‘what giants are you facing’ stuff. In my opinion, the book of Deuteronomy needs to be read somewhere between literalism and allegory. Meaning, this is a historical book with historical facts. It’s not purely an allegory, where each character in Deuteronomy is some aspect of our spiritual lives. Deuteronomy is not Pilgrim’s Progress. We must be careful not to over-spiritualize things. That being said, this book is not just a book. Rightly read and applied, it should correct us, rebuke us, teach us, and train us in righteousness.

I want us to think about this in a deeper way than pure allegory.

The people of God were rescued out of slavery in Egypt. Four hundred years of brutal, oppressive slavery in an evil empire’s back-breaking regime. They cried out to the Lord generation after generation. Finally, God rescues them in miraculous fashion with plagues and the parting of the Red Sea.

IT WAS THESE VERY MEN AND WOMEN WHO NOW REFUSED TO ENTER THE PROMISED LAND DUE TO FEAR.

They had seen God lay waste to the dynastic empire of that day. Egypt was it. They were the big dogs. And yet God laid utter waste to their land and their army in order to rescue His people.

Now you’re on the edge of the land promised to you by God. And some 13-foot giants scare you? What?

So my question for us is not what allegorical giants are in our lives.

No, my question is: Are we remembering what God has done for us?

The question is not what’s in our way.

The question is whether or not we obey.

You see, we have something much better than the people of God in Deuteronomy. We don’t have a prophet. Rather, we have the combination of God’s Word spoken to us in Scripture and the Spirit of God illuminating it for us. God does speak to us in His Word, in Scripture.

Are we obeying it?

Are you obeying it?

In His Name,

Nate Roach

Show Us A Sign

Thousands upon thousands of people had just been fed with five loaves and two fish. Every man, woman, and child had had their physical appetite met by a miraculous act of God the Father’s provision through His Son Jesus (John 6:1-14). They were hungry, away from home, listening to and learning from the man who did miracles all throughout their region. Then, God provided. Miraculously provided.

The crowds crossed the sea to Capernaum in order to continue following Jesus. Scripture says that they knew Jesus did not cross the sea with the disciples (John 6:22), yet they found him outside of Capernaum when they crossed the sea. The disciples even saw Jesus walk upon the water.

The miracle-worker was still at work. Thousands fed with one boy’s lunch. A sea crossed on foot.

Jesus sees the crowds and makes the bold proclamation that He is in fact the one who brings eternal life, and that the miracles He has been doing are to point the crowds to God (John 6:29).

Then comes the craziest verse ever.

So they said to Him, “What then do You do for a sign so that we may see, and believe You? What work do You perform?” – John 6:30

This is not a new crowd of people who say this to him. These are the people who were just fed miraculously, and who just deduced that Jesus did not take a boat to cross the sea yet still made it to the other side. This crowd had seen something amazing. We read the Bible with a background in church and this stuff doesn’t awe us or terrify us anymore. But think about it! JESUS FED THOUSANDS WITH ONE LITTLE MEAL. That would be like me going to the middle of Vernon with a Lunchable and calling everyone in town to come be fed, feeding everyone in town with my ham and cheese cracker stacks. Preposterous. Amazing.

Yet with this having happened just the day before, the crowds asked for a sign that Jesus was from heaven.

Doofuses.

Yet, if we’re being honest, we can be doofuses too.

I saw God miraculously move in the lives of so many students this week, drawing them to salvation and renewed commitment to Him. Here I sit just three days later and I can feel the icy tentacles on my mind trying to convince me that God’s power stayed at Camp Chaparral. God did the miraculous and yet here I am asking for a sign.

This theme of questioning God despite the miraculous is all over Scripture.

This afternoon on my day off I was reading through part of Genesis. In Genesis 14, Lot (Abram’s nephew) is captured by a coalition of five kings. Abram brings 318 men with him, fighting back and overcoming these kings, rescuing Lot, and achieving the spoils of war.

After this miraculous victory, Abram says the following:

I have sworn to the Lord God Most High, possessor of heaven and earth – Genesis 14:22b

Abram is swearing about something in this verse that isn’t all that important to the point I’m trying to make, what I want you to notice is that Abram is acknowledging that the God who appeared to him two chapters prior is the Lord God Most High, the possessor of heaven and earth. Abram knows that victory came at the hand of God, not at the hand of Abram.

Fast-forward one chapter.

I’m not an Old Testament scholar so I don’t know exactly how much time has passed between the two chapters, but God here appears to Abram and promises him a son, an heir.

Then comes the crazy stuff.

And He (God) said to him, “I am the Lord who brought you out of Ur of the Chaldeans, to give you this land to possess it.” He said, “O Lord God, how may I know that I will possess it?” – Genesis 15:7-8

God promises him a son and land to possess.

Abram responds by questioning how he will know this will take place.

Maybe I’m reaching, I acknowledge that I could be wrong here. But it fascinates me nonetheless that Abram asks God more or less for a sign that He will be faithful.

Wouldn’t the military victory brought about in the previous chapter be that sign? Five kings against 318 men, and God gave victory to Abram.

Regardless of whether or not I’m reading too much into the story, the principle is true in my life.

I question God’s ability to provide and protect, right on the heels of Him showing me the miraculous.

Do you believe the promises of God? Have you seen the miraculous? If you have, are you all in with the Lord? Have you abandoned your own desires for the cause of Christ? Or are you asking for another sign?

If you are a follower of Jesus, then God has done the miraculous in your life.

Therefore I said to you that you will die in your sins; for unless you believe that I am he, you will die in your sins. – John 8:24

Here Jesus is saying to the crowds that if they don’t believe that He is the Messiah they will die in their sins. This doesn’t sound miraculous. But think about it inversely.

The fact that you have put your faith in Jesus, and thus have life instead of the death you deserve, is MIRACULOUS.

Acts 17:25 says that God supplies us with life, breath, and everything else.

Each day is a miracle.

Are you trusting in the character of God or are you coming off a miracle asking for a sign?

In His Name,

Nate Roach

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He Never Slumbers

This season of wedding and camp preparations is making me feel like I’m moving a billion miles per hour. I am beyond grateful for a family in our church who is letting me stay with them, but not being able to stay at my own home (Jamie is getting it ready and actually looking like a home) has made me feel like I’m on vacation but still having to work every day. It is a weird feeling.

My natural tendency in the moments where life feels out of control is to do my foolish best to bring life back under my control. No matter how hard I grit my teeth and try and push forward into some semblance of faux control, I end up coming back to the same spot of acknowledging that I’m tired and can’t keep going. When life is going a billion miles an hour, I also slip into a subtle but not so subtle spiritual malaise where even when I’m spending time in God’s Word, I’m not spending time with God.

The last couple weeks of crazy I’ve been in God’s Word each day, yet the intimacy of just shutting up and listening to God while truly meditating on His Word in His presence has been missing. So this morning I decided to do just that before hopping in the shower to start my day. I opened up my Bible to read and pray a Psalm and Psalm 121 came crashing into my heart at the exact time I needed it (God is pretty great).

I will lift up my eyes to the mountains; From where shall my help come? My help comes from the Lord, Who made heaven and earth. He will not allow your foot to slip; He who keeps you will not slumber. Behold, He who keeps Israel Will neither slumber nor sleep. The Lord is your keeper; The Lord is your shade on your right hand. The sun will not smite you by day, Nor the moon by night. The Lord will protect you from all evil; He will keep your soul. The Lord will guard your going out and your coming in From this time forth and forever. – Psalm 121:1-8

Boom. A shorter Psalm with a power punch. In seasons of hecticness, I can try and grip the wheel tighter and try and hold onto all the control, which is hilarious really and never works out. This Psalm is one that draws us as God’s people into worship. My help comes from the Lord, who lest I forget, made the heavens and the earth, the entire cosmos we reside in.

I hope that you are encouraged by this passage. I know that there are mental health circumstances that make battling anxiety not so black and white, but for many of us this Psalm is the soothing oil we need to calm our anxious nerves. I believe the cure to much of our anxiety is found in meditating upon this Psalm and taking it to heart.

While in Phoenix, my anxiety was through the roof and I did a horrible job of handling it. Since I’ve been back to Texas, the anxiety can still spike in the weirdest of ways. Small triggers.

– realizing that a job responsibility slipped past my to-do list, causing anxiousness about my job performance.

– hearing an expletive-laced rant in front of a gym next door to where Jamie works, causing anxiousness about her safety.

– a text message casting doubt on how someone views me, causing anxiousness about my identity.

None of these are really life and death situations, yet all of them are aspects of life that we should care about. Vocation, loved ones, self. That being said, if I don’t nip these fast-flowing anxious thoughts in the bud, they can spiral on me and I start playing the ‘what-if’ game.

Psalm 121 blows this up.

When I’m getting anxious, I can lift up my eyes to the heavens in a way to remind myself that my help comes from God above. He is creative, good, orderly, and perfect. Just read the creation account. God makes, and what He makes is good. God separates, bringing order to an otherwise orderless cosmos. Sin entered the picture and so we live in a fallen world, but God’s purposes and promises are secure. He says let there be light, and by the very power of His words light is made. This alone is a stunning reminder that all God says, all He proclaims, will come to pass. He made the heavens and earth.

Verse three is amazing. He who watches over us does not slumber. He does not sleep. Jamie will tell you that I hate sleeping too long or napping. I am prone to being a productivity slave (that’s a blog for another time) and thus refuse most times to take necessary rest (leading to me being late to a morning appointment and accidentally crashing into a two hour nap just yesterday). Resting or sleeping is hard, because in my foolish brain and heart my inaction is equivalent to my cosmos being out of order. Yet I am but a creature. I am an image-bearer of God who needs rest.

Juxtaposed to this need for daily rest is the God who never sleeps. In verse four it says that He watches over all of the people of God. He has us all securely in view, and He cares for us deeply.

Verse seven tells us that God will keep us from evil (not that bad things won’t happen to us as His followers, rather that the enemy of our souls will not win our souls).

Verse eight is such a pleasant piece of Scripture. The Lord will guard my going out and coming in forever. There is nowhere I can go where He is not watching over me. I am always in His hands.

This Psalm is a solvent that dissolves my anxiety.

My prayer is that it would do the same for you. He is worthy of our praise and our trust.

In His Name,

Nathan Roach

DISCLAIMER: As stated in passing, I believe that there are chemical imbalances, mental health issues, etc. that make fighting anxiety much more difficult than I’ve written about here. I pray for those experiencing such things, and I am not intending to belittle those very real, very personal struggles.

BREAD MAN?

When you think of heroic men of valor, what comes to mind? For me, it’s images of Mel Gibson defending Scotland, Russel Crowe fighting for Rome, and Tom Hanks storming the beach at Normandy. It’s the image of a gun, a sword, an axe, or a horse.

When I hear the word hero, I definitely don’t imagine a loaf of bread. Facebook timeline

Yet this is what Gideon was envisioned as by his enemies in Judges 6-7. And in my humble opinion, it’s super fitting. Gideon was a man who was not courageous, not confident, and not strong, in his own power at least. I grew up being told his story, hearing of his character being worthy of emulation and imitation. Now, he was surely used by God in a great way, but God poured out grace and strength in his life.

Gideon’s story starts in a bleak and dark season of Israelite history. The book of Judges is set in a period of time when God’s people did what was right in their own eyes, there was little to no submission to God’s leadership of the people. Idolatry was rampant, and the people of God were not worshipping the Lord. In steps the Midianites, who oppress and overpower God’s people. They steal crops, women, and the general livelihood of the Israelites, who then flee to the mountains and caves.

The people of Israel cry out to God for deliverance (Judges 6:7) and God responds by sending a prophet, ultimately raising up Gideon to save them.

When we first see Gideon, he was hiding (Judges 6:11). Now this was likely a smart move since the Midianites were stealing crops. However, it is still a sign that he wasn’t the most bold dude around. Look at how crazy his calling is though.

And the angel of the Lord appeared to him and said to him, “The Lord is with you, O mighty man of valor.” – Judges 6:12

The Lord looks at a man who is hiding from the enemy forces and refers to him as a mighty man of valor. What a great reminder that God sees us for who we can be in His strength and grace. I LOATHE the cliche nature of what I’m about to say, but I think it is fairly true: “God doesn’t call the equipped, he equips the called.” God obviously knew what Gideon would be able to do in His divine strength, and so he calls him what he knows he can be.

Now right off the bat, we see Gideon in doubt and fear. If you follow along with your Bible open, you will see that Gideon questions God’s presence with Israel and questions God’s call of him specifically. God tells Gideon that He will be with him in verse sixteen. You would think this would suffice, but Gideon still doubts. The rest of the chapter is three different tests that Gideon wants God to come through in before Gideon will believe in Him.

Here’s why I don’t see Gideon as a superhero of the faith. When God tells Gideon to destroy the altar of an idol in this chapter, Gideon did so in the middle of the night.

So Gideon took ten men of his servants and did as the Lord had told him. But because he was too afraid of his family and the men of the town to do it by day, he did it by night. – Judges 6:27

What in the world. You’ve been approached by God. He has told you that He will be with you as you do what He commands. And yet you’re still afraid.

Look at chapter seven. Gideon is not done being afraid.

God takes Gideon’s army of 32,000 and whittles it down to 300, in order to be able to show that it is His power working through Gideon’s troops. Even after all of God’s promises and proclamations, God knows that Gideon is still afraid.

But if you are afraid to go down, go down to the camp with Purah your servant. And you shall hear what they say, and afterward your hands shall be strengthened to go down against the camp – Judges 7:10-11a

Here’s the best part of the story:

When Gideon came, behold, a man was telling a dream to his comrade. And he said, “Behold, I dreamed a dream, and behold, a cake of barley bread tumbled into the camp of Midian and came to the tent and struck it so that it fell and turned it upside down, so that the tent lay flat.” And his comrade answered, “This is no other than the sword of Gideon the son of Joash, a man of Israel; God has given into his hand Midian and all the camp. – Judges 7:13-14

This makes me laugh so much. Gideon is envisioned in this enemy soldier’s dream as….. a loaf of bread.

Fitting.

Gideon hears this and worships, and ends up leading the people of God to victory over the Midianites.

Gideon isn’t a superhero of the faith however. Yes, he’s listed in Hebrews 11 in the ‘faith hall of fame’. But the story of Gideon is not the story of his amazing faith in God.

No, the story of Gideon is the story of the God who is patient in our doubt and present in our fear. STORY OF GIDEON

It may appear like I was taking shots at Gideon, but in all honesty I know that I am much the same as him, if not worse. God can speak to me through His word, reminding me of his promises, and I respond with doubt and fear. God can prove His presence in my life time and time again, and I’ll still feel like I’ll need proof that He’ll come through again.

Be. Encouraged.

God is patient in our doubt and present in our fear. He will walk you through any battle, any trial that you may be facing. Doubt and fear are normal emotions. We aren’t called to dwell in them but we can be encouraged that He will walk us through them.

He is patient in our doubt and present in our fear.

In His Name,

Nathan Roach

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