Why Are You Here?

What am I passionate about?

What flows from my mouth into conversation and through my fingers onto social media?

What drives me to ecstatic exuberance?

What motivates the choices that I make and the way I spend my time?

What is my purpose for being here?

These questions are regularly rolling around in my mind. I want to live a life that is all about the glory of God. I fall short of that desire all the time. But I strive for it. I strive to live for Jesus, the Kingdom of God, and discipleship. EVERYTHING else is just extra.

Maybe I’m crazy. I honestly feel that way at times. But I can’t escape the fire in my heart that drives me to want to spread the Kingdom of God on earth. I want to light a fire in the hearts of others as well.

Just this morning, I started a biography on Hudson and Maria Taylor, missionaries to China. I was knocked off guard in the first pages by the reality that Hudson’s father, get this, PRAYED FOR HIS NOT YET BORN SON TO BECOME A MISSIONARY TO THE VASTLY UNREACHED CHINESE PEOPLE. I write that in all caps because it blows me away.

Who is doing that today?

Are we praying that God would send their future children into dangerous parts of the world for the spread of the Kingdom of God?

Or are we praying that our future children ‘make an impact for Jesus’ while accumulating all the benefits of the American dream and likely selling their soul for earthly trinkets?

Church, this must not be.

It cannot be.

This morning I also began a book on the state of the global church. The two brilliant authors spoke about the following:

  1. The Western church is polarized by doctrine and social issues. Sound familiar?
  2. The Pentecostal church is exploding throughout the globe, due to its emphasis on God still being at work.
  3. Jesus didn’t come to simply establish traditional modern churches. He came to inaugurate the Kingdom.

Here’s my quick takeaway. To my fellow Westerners, what is your passion? Is it truly the gospel and discipleship? If someone looked at your time, money, conversations, and arguments, would they see a desire to make God known?

I don’t think that would be the answer for most of us. If you asked me, I’d think that most would see us Christians as the most polarizing of all. Just look at what you’ve said about Covid-19. Have you posted about politics and plots and government takeovers? Or have you posted about God and His glory, for instance how Psalm 9 says that all of the nations are under His control (by the way, when it says ALL nations are under His control, there’s no caveat dependent upon whether a Republican or Democrat is in office)?

The other night, one of my close friends showed me this awesome new telescope he had just purchased. It’s awesome.

This guy is a stinking genius, so once he got to talking about the intricacies of the telescope and the intricacies of space, he lost me. But he was so passionate about it. It was awesome.

I started thinking, I wish I was that passionate about Jesus. Not my doctrinal beliefs. Not my vision for our church (albeit these aren’t bad things). Not my political opinions or my favorite hobbies. Not even my family or my dog. What if I just couldn’t help but talk about Jesus?

What if the Kingdom of God was everything to me?

And just like that, the spark was lit afresh.

Maybe you’re there. Maybe, the spark is lit in your heart.

Here’s how you fan it into flame.

Reflect.

If you aren’t reflecting on the truths of the gospel, you obviously will have no passion to share it.

Just think about Ephesians 2. We were DEAD in our sins. Straight up dead. And then we get this phrase:

But God, being rich in mercy, because of the great love with which he loved us, – Ephesians 2:4

The verses that follow this one tease out the gospel message.

Just think.

We were dead.

But God was rich in mercy and great in love.

Commune.

The times I’m most on fire for Jesus follow the times I’m deeply communing with Him. I’m talking distraction-free time with Him. For me it looks like leaving my phone away, grabbing a Message version of the Bible, and going to pray. I love to study Scripture and journal and go through reading plans, and so I have to keep it really simple so that I’m actually communing with God rather than filling my mind with more knowledge.

I don’t know what it will look like for you, but commune with God your Father. Let Him fan your heart into flame.

Disciple.

I will try and keep this simple.

Meet with someone.

One on one.

Around Scripture.

We need to remember there is a difference between spiritual community (a common faith in God that bonds friendships) and Biblical community (a common study of God’s Word).

I have lots of spiritual community, but I’m not sure how much Biblical community I have.

But discipleship, that lights my fire.

I had lunch yesterday with a young man I used to mentor and then met with a young man I currently am mentoring. Hearing them talk about Jesus is the most amazing thing in the world.

Our churches will die without discipleship.

Oops, I hope that was simple.

Go.

This book I read on the global church talked about how the church how we know it is dying. It is.

The church will not grow by pragmatic plans or programs. It won’t grow by clinging tight to tradition and ‘how we’ve always done it’. It won’t grow by complaining or arguing or debating. It won’t grow by simply wishing things were different. It won’t grow by coming up with some great new model of church although those things aren’t bad. It certainly won’t grow by sitting in our ivory towers and judging the world around us for how they dress, talk, and live.

It will grow by doing everything we can to reach a new generation while clinging to the truth of the gospel. This gets me amped because student ministry shouldn’t be a thing. We’ve created a mini church for youth because our churches as a whole won’t often adapt to them. We are called to disciple them, to grow together. Older men and women investing in younger men and women. That’s the call of the book of Titus. If we as churches did this, I wouldn’t have a job. The church would reach the next generation, not one man. And I would be so overjoyed if that came to pass.

The church will grow by going.

By using every single day, every one, to make an impact for the Kingdom of God.

Why are you here?

To make it to the weekend? To get a promotion? To raise ‘good’ kids? To leave a legacy for your own name and praise?

I want to live in such a way that I am answering my own prayer, “Your kingdom come, your will be done, on earth, as it is in heaven.”

In His Name,

Nate Roach

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Do What I Ask Of You

And James and John, the sons of Zebedee, came up to him and said to him, “Teacher, we want you to do for us whatever we ask of you.”

I was in my room reading this morning when my eyes fell on this verse (Mark 10:36). I was stunned and immediately started judging these two disciples. I mean, the audacity of these two men to approach Jesus and say such a statement is appalling. I mean, this is Jesus, the Son of God, who had been doing miracle after miracle throughout the region while teaching about repentance and the good news of the kingdom’s arrival. They had witnessed Him casting out demons, feeding multitudes with just a few fish and a couple loaves of bread, teaching about true religion, and healing tons of people. Yet despite having seen all of this power and glory, they chose to approach Him with their list of things He needed to do for them.

This seems so totally crazy, right? The acts of Jesus should have drawn these men into deep worship and adoration, but it instead led them to think selfishly about the ways that Jesus could bless their lives and bless their status.

Quickly, very quickly, my mind went to the ways that I have treated Jesus in exactly the same way. He has shown His power in my life in many ways. The way He saved me alone is enough of a sign of His power. Not to mention the daily gifts of grace that He provides for me. The daily ways that He protects me. The ways that He has done incredible things in the lives of my friends and family members for as long as I can remember.

The Scriptures show me His glory as well. The entire Bible paints a tremendous picture of His greatness, holiness, and majesty. Every story I read is a reminder of His greatness and His grace. It’s legitimately on each page, sometimes explicitly and other times implicitly.

Yet with all of this evidence of His character that should be pushing me into worship and adoration of Him, I still come to Him some days (or most days) with a list of things in my life that I want Him to bless. If I’m in a rush to get started in school and work responsibilities my time with Him becomes just a chance for me to quickly tell Him everything that I want from Him throughout the day.

I too approach Him and say:

I want you to do for me whatever I ask of you

When did we get it so backwards? Obviously as evidenced by Scripture, this is not a new struggle. We all have the tendency to approach the greatness of our God with our lists.

There is definitely a healthy way to ask for God’s providence in your life. In the Lord’s Prayer we are told to state, “Give us this day our daily bread.” Our God is compassionate and loving, quick to extend mercy and help in our time of need. There is no sin in asking God for His help in a situation. Yet to come to the Lord as if He is obligated to meet our needs is preposterous. We serve a gracious and generous God, but we don’t serve a God who is entitled to give us a thing.

If you’re like me, it’s easy to subconsciously come to God with this type of mentality.

Don’t make this same mistake.

Go to the Lord in faith, asking Him to move. But don’t act like He’s required to.

In His Name,

Nathan Roach

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