The Lowest In The Room

It’s mid-evening, and we just went on a walk as a family. I’m sitting in the living room with a good book. Gracie has been asleep for three minutes and I’m eagerly diving into a new book I just received in the mail. The baby monitor is right next to me and I hear her waking up. I can go comfort her, or I can keep reading.

I’m on vacation with my family in Waco. As we’re planning our trip back to Vernon, Jamie mentions that she wants to stop at a furniture store for an extended period of time. I can joyfully participate in this excursion or make it a draining experience of me clearly being annoyed and frustrated.

I’m sitting in staff meeting trying to stay mentally engaged after an early morning trip to Wichita Falls. Ideas are flying around about this or that upcoming ministry opportunity. Assignments are dished out, some that I wouldn’t have gone looking for. I can faithfully do the assignments I’ve been given with a cheerful attitude or just get by with mediocre work.

In all of these recent scenarios, I had a choice. I could choose my comfort, my way of life, my priorities and passions.

Or I could stoop.

I could submit.

I could put Gracie, Jamie, and my coworkers first.

In our modern world, the idea of submitting to any authority is frowned upon by some. It is difficult for most, myself included. Everywhere we look we’re told that we should be in charge, that we should pursue what’s best for ourselves. I mean, the loudest, proudest and meanest are the ones that get the spotlight and the responsibilities.

You want attention? Be the loudest in the room.

You want to be like Jesus? Be the lowest in the room.

You want to model the character of Christ? Submit.

In Ephesians 5, Paul shares with the church in Ephesus the behaviors and character traits of those who are seeking to walk in the light of God’s presence. After detailing the importance of being filled with the Spirit as opposed to earthly things, Paul says the church should be doing the following:

Submitting to one another out of reverence for Christ. – Ephesians 5:21

Submission. It’s the way we show our love for Jesus. It’s the way that we grow our relationships as the people of God.

In my marriage, I am to willingly submit to the desires of Jamie. In my parenting, I am to willingly submit to the desires of Gracie. This doesn’t mean I don’t lead my family in the way that God has called me to. It just means my family is not about me. In my job, I am to submit to Brooks, Donovan, Mike, Greg, Tisha, Joni, and Sandra. I am to be consistently seeking the good of all those around me.

And when I do so, I am living in the way that Jesus would.

That being said, don’t get me wrong. Submission isn’t easy to me. I still don’t want to listen to others when I think I’m right. I still don’t want to submit to the preferences of others when I’m passionate about my way. But if I’m staunchly, arrogantly refusing to submit to anyone or anything, I’m showing that I am not fully grasping Jesus nor the commands of the New Testament.

A friend recently said to me that the entire New Testament ethic could be summarized in the word submission. And I’m inclined to agree with him. We’re called to submit to Scripture, the Spirit, the government authorities (not just those we voted for), our spouses, our pastors, etc. Submission is central. So why isn’t it practiced in our lives?

Probably because submission doesn’t come naturally. Yet, I can tell you that it’s the way to fullness of life. When I stoop, I feel joyful. When I submit, I feel like I’m living in the way that God designed me to live. When I stoop, I dream of and envision a church, a community, that is full of submission.

What would that look like?

What if we went out of our way to promote someone else’s worship style? What if we went out of our way to give someone else the spotlight? What if we went out of our way to make someone else’s ministry idea happen even if we aren’t naturally on board with it? What if we went out of our way to serve and sit under the authority and leadership of others? What if we went out of our way to stoop, stoop, stoop.

Man, that would be something else.

I think that would be the type of community that God desires us to be.

So, as counter-cultural as it may sound, I want to submit.

I invite you to do the same.

In His Name,

Nate Roach

Why Is The World Still Spinning?

Why is the world still spinning?

I get spiritually oppressed and tired of the darkness.

I’m tired of the stories I hear and stories I live out where children are in need, families are broken apart, and tragedies decimate communities. I am tired of seeing and knowing that there are innumerable lonely people in our churches, something antithetical to the New Testament. I am tired of the questions in my life that I can’t seem to answer. I am tired of seeing myself and others more vocal about politics than the Savior. I am tired of seeing my heart full of the American Dream instead of the Great Commission.

I get tired.

But I know I’m not alone in that spiritual exhaustion.

A friend recently told me “I have never felt the brokenness of this world more than today”.

Why is the world still spinning? Why hasn’t Jesus come to make all things new?

This past week I came to an answer to that question that is groan-worthily cheesy, yet Biblically accurate.

The world is still spinning because Jesus is still winning.

Yes. I know.

Grossly cheesy.

Yet it is profoundly Biblical. And it has been a source of daily bread to sustain me.

I’ve been on a Paul David Tripp binge. Reading his books, listening to his sermons, and reading his bi-weekly articles and devotionals. In a recent article, he directed my eyes towards 1 Corinthians 15 as a source of hope.

Then comes the end, when he delivers the kingdom to God the Father after destroying every rule and every authority and power. For he must reign until he has put all of his enemies under his feet. The last enemy to be destroyed is death. – 1 Corinthians 15:24-26

This is what I need. I have to thrust this passage in front of my eyes every day. It is my daily bread. The end of our world hasn’t come because Jesus is still reigning, still winning, still putting all of his enemies under his feet. He is still at work.

When I’m really getting down, after meditating on the things of this world, I have the mental image of a light coming down a tunnel, impending darkness and suffering that I can’t escape barreling down at me like a train. I’ve journaled about those feelings more often than I’d care to admit. When I meditate on the things of this world, the news, social media, entertainment, etc., the future seems really bleak. Unavoidably bleak.

This passage shifts that mindset though. The light at the end of the tunnel isn’t an oncoming train. It’s the destruction of death.

It’s the Kingdom where my deaf brother and my ailing grandfather are made physically whole, the Kingdom where the popular and the outcast are on a level playing field, the Kingdom where the tears of my loved ones are turned to cheers of joy, the Kingdom where those who claim Christ don’t worship idols like politics, the Kingdom where it’s all made new.

If this life is everything, it’s hopeless.

But as followers of Jesus, we can cling to this hope. Jesus is still reigning. Jesus is still winning. Jesus is still subjecting every spiritual ruler and authority to His Lordship.

The world is still spinning because Jesus is still winning.

It’s time we reorient ourselves and get involved in His work.

In His Name,

Nate Roach